Agenda and minutes

Council
Wednesday, 14th July, 2021 6.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber, Civic Centre, Oldham, West Street, Oldham, OL1 1NL

Contact: Liz Drogan 

Items
No. Item

1.

To receive apologies for absence

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors Chadderton, Lancaster and Leach.

2.

TO ORDER THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL HELD ON 19TH MAY 2021 BE SIGNED AS A CORRECT RECORD pdf icon PDF 229 KB

Minutes:

RESOLVED – That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 19th May 2021 be approved as a correct record subject to Councillor Lancaster to be added to the attendance list.

3.

To receive declarations of interest in any matter to be determined at the meeting

Minutes:

Councillors Birch and C and H Gloster declared a personal interest in item 8D and Councillors Garry and Wilkinson declared a pecuniary interest in 8D by virtue of employment with Greater Manchester Police.

 

Councillors Ahmed, Akhtar, Alexander, Alyas, Brownridge, Cosgrove, S and M Bashworth, Goodwin, Jabbar, Moores, Roberts, Sykes and Sheldon  declared a personal interest in agenda item 10 by virtue of being a Member of the Greater Manchester Pension Scheme.

 

Councillor Shuttleworth declared a personal interest in the Oldham Council Cabinet minutes of 22nd March 2021, (page 34, item 10) by virtue of being a member of the Unity Partnership Board.

 

4.

TO DEAL WITH MATTERS WHICH THE MAYOR CONSIDERS TO BE URGENT BUSINESS

Minutes:

There were no items of Urgent Business.

5.

TO RECEIVE COMMUNICATIONS RELATING TO THE BUSINESS OF THE COUNCIL

Minutes:

The Mayor advised that the Leader of the Council, Councillor Shah had requested to read a statement to the meeting.  Council agreed to the request.

 

As follows:

 

Councillor Arooj Shah, Leader of the Council

 

In November 2019, Oldham Council and Oldham’s Safeguarding Board wrote to the Greater Manchester Combined Authority to commission an independent review into the effectiveness of multi-agency responses to Child Sexual Exploitation in Oldham.

 

The review’s remit is to look at historical allegations relating to child sexual exploitation and, to consider whether the Council and its partners provided an appropriate response to protect children.

 

The Greater Manchester Combined Authority appointed Malcolm Newsham and Gary Ridgeway to oversee this review.  Both Gary and Malcolm have extensive experience in social care and policing and have carried out reviews in other areas including Northamptonshire and, more recently, Manchester.

 

I recently wrote to Baroness Beverly Hughes, Deputy Mayor of Greater Manchester to ask her to provide an update on the progress of this review.

Baroness Hughes has confirmed that the review is progressing well and that they continue to receive the support and access to information that they need to complete their work effectively.

 

She has confirmed that the Review Team have so far received hundreds of documents, report and files, interviewed over 45 people and received 9 written submissions relating to their enquiries.

 

Baroness Hughes has provided assurances that a first draft of the report should be completed by September, but that a number of procedural steps must then be taken, including review by legal counsel to ensure the report is appropriately anonymised and in line with data protection legislation, and review by individuals mentioned to give them the opportunity to make representations.  She has informed us that given the complexity and scale of this work, that this could take “a number of months”.

 

We all share a desire for the review to be published as soon as possible, but we cannot rush them and risk jeopardising the ability of the Review team to complete their work diligently, thoroughly and transparently.

 

I can confirm that the Council will do everything in its power to support the swift publication of this report once it is finalised.  Our biggest responsibility as a Council is to keep our children and young people safe.  The review team are leading experts, so I have no doubt they will identify areas where our work in the past has fallen short.

 

I would add Madam Mayor, that nothing should be said today that seeks to pre-empt or undermine the review.  I am acutely aware that those who seek to make political capital will portray whatever is found as part of a conspiracy if it falls short of completing a XXXXX, all that was done at the time to protect young people.  We must not allow that to guide us, or to blind us in that we must take its findings, even where it offers challenge, and use that to ensure that lessons are learned.   Nothing Madam Mayor,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 5.

6.

TO RECEIVE AND NOTE PETITIONS RECEIVED RELATING TO THE BUSINESS OF THE COUNCIL

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There are no petitions to consider.

Minutes:

There were no petitions to consider.

7.

YOUTH COUNCIL

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There is no Youth Council business to consider.

Minutes:

There was no Youth Council business to consider.

8.

Questions Time

Minutes:

The Mayor advised that the next item on the agenda was Public Question Time.  Questions had been received from members of the public and would be taken in the order in which they had been received.  Council was advised that the question would be read out by the Mayor.

 

8a

Public Questions

(time limit 15 Minutes)

Minutes:

The following questions were submitted:

 

1.         Question received from Mark Birchall via email:

 

“Could we have a statement from the Leader of the Council regarding the latest vandalism and violence at the factory on the 21st June 2021.  We are aware that MP, Debbie Abrahams, the Leader of OMBC and several Councillors attended to support the demonstration in Parliament Square.

 

Was any consideration given to the struggling business owners in the area who probably were affected by this, also the constant attendance at the factory which has now been taken to a different and more dangerous level.  Has consideration been given to residents near to the factory who are having to ensure this kind of behaviour and are concerned for their own safety with the level of violence and vandalism now being carried out at the premises.

 

Councillor Arooj Shah, Leader of the Council responded:

 

“The right to peaceful protest is a vital element of any functioning democracy and one that should be forcefully defended.  The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill that the Government are currently trying to pass and which, amongst other things allows the Police to restrict protests that are noisy, is an affront to our democracy.

 

Peaceful protest should not lead to vandalism and violence, however, we will always work with the Police and our partners to stop that happening.  We are aware that GMP are in regular dialogue with Elbit and have a patrol plan for the area to reassure businesses and residents.”

 

2.         Question received from Robert Barnes via email:

 

“Following the attack on Elbit Ferranti on Monday, June 21 2021 with the smashing of windows and paint being thrown on the floor outside the building, will the Council Leader categorically condemn the violence aimed at a business in our town?

 

Furthermore, will she also look into the issue of young children being taken to the regular protests that are held outside Elbit Ferranti?  This should be a cause of great concern and treated as a potential safeguarding issue as children are too young to understand the very complex issues surrounding this matter.  Children of such a young age should not be at such protests.”

 

Councillor Arooj Shah, Leader of the Council responded:

 

“I won’t repeat what I said in answer to the previous question.  On the specific issue of young people at protest, parents and carers can make the decision to bring their children to organised demonstrations/protests.  There is no legislation that enables the Local Authority to prevent this.  However, if individual safeguarding concerns arise at the time of the event and it is felt that a child is at risk of significant harm as a result, then safeguarding processes should be followed and a referral made into Children Services for consideration.

 

We work closely with GMP and partner agencies to ensure safeguarding processes are followed in such circumstances and look to minimise associated risks by engaging with protest organisers in the event planning stage.”

 

3.         Question received from Lewis Quigg via  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8a

8b

Questions to Leader and Cabinet

(time limit 30 minutes)

Minutes:

Councillor Sykes, Leader of the Liberal Democratic Group:

 

“I welcome Councillor Shah to this meeting.  I’m sure everyone would join me in condemning what she has had to experience recently and in doing so showing those people that we are conducting the business of the town here tonight.”

 

My first question to the Leader tonight is on an issue that for my Liberal Democrat colleagues and I think is of paramount importance to the future of the people of our Borough, and indeed the people of our planet. I am, of course, referring to climate change and this Council’s ambitious targets to become carbon neutral in 2025 and make our Borough carbon neutral by 2030.  Oldham cannot of course single-handedly save the world from climate change, but by taking practical actions to reduce our carbon footprint, and by leading by example, we can make a difference.  Every little helps. So, I was pleased to see in the recently published Covid Recovery Strategy reference to the ‘green recovery’.  But, unfortunately, when it comes to actions and targets the document falls short on specifics. It references our intention to ‘develop plans’ for a new District Heat Network using renewable heat from disused mines underneath the town centre; to ‘start to deliver’ improvements in energy efficiency in social housing; and to ‘develop plans’ for Council corporate assets. The mine heat project is something I personally welcome as I first suggested it to the then Leader at the October 2014 Council meeting, but sadly it must surely now be in jeopardy as the Government has failed to support the proposal as part of our Towns Fund bid?  But, in any case, this misses the real point.

 

In Bedford, as just one example, the Council also declared a climate emergency, identified its baseline level of carbon emissions, and by installing solar panels on its Council buildings, replacing street lighting with LEDs, and establishing a hydro power scheme in the Great Ouse River, reduced its carbon emissions by 62%.  2025 is only four years away. 

 

Would the Leader not agree that by now we as a Council should be ‘doing’ like Bedford and not just ‘planning’ and ‘starting to deliver’?  So, when are we going to start ‘doing it’?  Otherwise, how are we as a Council showing leadership and providing encouragement to our public, social and private sector partners and our citizens to join us by doing their bit to stop climate change and save our planet?”

 

Councillor Arooj Shah, Leader of the Council responded:

 

“Can I acknowledge Cllr Sykes initial comments regarding the last 24 hours which have been very difficult?  I cannot say that this has not affected   my family and the people I love, because it has, but what I am clear about, that whoever is responsible, and for whatever reason, I will not be diverted from the task in hand.  Madam Mayor our town is facing some of its biggest challenges yet, and as we emerge from Covid, the fragile nature of  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8b

9.

Questions on Cabinet Minutes pdf icon PDF 350 KB

(time limit 15 minutes)

 

23rd February 2021

23rd March 2021

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council was requested to note the minutes of the Cabinet meetings held on the undermentioned dates and to receive any questions on any items within the minutes from Members of the Council  who were not Members of the Cabinet, and receive responses from Cabinet Members.  The minutes of the Cabinet meetings held on 23rd February 2021 and 22nd March 2021 were submitted.

 

Members raised the following questions:

 

Councillor Byrne –

 

“On the street bin replacement, it does not seem clear whether the bin replacement is going to cover the whole borough.  Each time I have made an enquiry, I have had a rather ambiguous answer because in my ward and ward surroundings, we have bins that have been removed and not replaced and when we ask the question about replacement, that response ambiguous in some cases, they say “we will leave you an extra bag”.  When I look through these, I didn’t find a commitment to site.  I presume we are going to be sent a list of possible sites so that we can comment on them?”

 

Cllr Arooj Shah, Leader of the Council responded:

 

“Councillor Chadderton is not present today.  I will pass on Councillor Byrne’s comments and pass them on to Councillor Chadderton.  Thank you so much.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.

Questions on Joint Arrangements pdf icon PDF 429 KB

(time limit 15 minutes)

 

AGMA

12th February 2021

GMCA

12th February 2021

23rd March 2021

GM Police, Fire and Crime Panel

29th January 2021

GM Waste and Recycling Committee

13th January 2021

GM Health and Social Care Partnership

31st January 2021

26th March 2021

GM Transport Committee

11th December 2020

12th February 2021

24th March 2021

National Park Authority

4th December 2020

19th February 2021

19th March 2021

Oldham Leadership Board

16th April 2021

Commissioning Partnership Board

25th February 2021

25th March 2021

Health and Wellbeing Board

26th January 2021

23rd January 2021

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council was requested to note the minutes of the following Joint and Partnership meetings and the relevant spokesperson to respond to questions from members.

 

The minutes of the Joint Authorities and Partnerships were submitted as follows:

 

AGMA

12th February 2021

GMCA

12th February 2021

23rd March 2021

GM Police, Fire and Crime Panel

29th January 2021

GM Waste and Recycling Committee

13th January 2021

GM Health and Social Care Partnership

31st January 2021

26th March 20201

GM Transport Committee

11th December 2020

12th February 2021

24th March 2021

National Park Authority

4th December 2020

19th February 2021

19th March 2021

Oldham Leadership Board

16th April 2021

Commissioning Partnership Board

25th February 2021

25th March 2021

Health and Wellbeing Board

26th January 2021

23rd January 2021

 

Members raised the following questions:

 

Councillor H Gloster

 

“GMCA minutes 12th February 2021 – GMCA 37/21 – GM Brownfield Housing Fund – Additional Award of Funding from MHCLG –“Over £81m had been awarded to Greater Manchester to support Housing Development projects on Brownfield land sites.  Please can the Cabinet Member tell me how much of this money has been awarded for Brownfield developments in Oldham and how many extra new homes can now be built on Brownfield instead of on Green Belt sites as a result.  Is there any estimate as to how much more money would be needed in Oldham to build all the new homes proposed for the Borough in the Places for Everyone plan solely on Brownfield sites.”

 

Councillor Hannah Roberts, Cabinet Member, Housing responded:

 

“I am delighted to confirm that Oldham has been successful in securing a provisional allocation from the fund for just over £8m across four sites to deliver up to 551 new homes.  Unfortunately, no estimate exists of how much it will cost for all Brownfield sites in Oldham to be built on, however I can assure you that we will continue to do everything that we can to make sure that we bid and are successful in bidding for housing development on Brownfield sites and to maximise the funding opportunities that will support this approach.  We have discussed this before at Full Council.  The flexible housing fund exists to help us do that.  I would also note that it is not possible to meet the Tory housing need target.  There just aren’t enough of them despite all of our efforts scouring the Borough for any sites that may become available, developing the mill strategy and significant increasing the number of homes planned for the town centre.”

 

Councillor Al-Hamdani

 

“GMCA 33/21 – Climate Emergency – 6-month update – Over £10m of Green Homes Grants have been awarded or energy efficiency and over £80m of funds secured to retrofit public buildings in Greater Manchester, with an additional £15m of grants anticipated to be made available this year.  Can the Cabinet Member tell me how much of that money has  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10.

11.

Notice of Administration Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

Councillor Mushtaq to MOVE and Councillor Moores to SECOND:

 

Recovery in Education and Young Children’s Development

This Council notes that:

  • Sir Kevan Collins, appointed by the Prime Minister as the Government’s Education Recovery Commissioner judged that some £15bn was needed to repair the damage done to the nation’s pupils because of Covid.
  • On 2nd June the Government published its plans for education recovery after the pandemic. Its offer, £1.4bn, falls far short and is completely inadequate to build back better from the pandemic and have an education system that supports high standards and strong mental health for everyone. 
  • The Government’s funding is intended mainly for tutors for children in schools. Other essential support, especially for disadvantaged children is not provided for.
  • Moreover, there is no mention of support to ensure good development of children in their early years.

This Council further notes that

  • Evidence from research for the Government supports the necessity for greater resources for children in Oldham, who are among the poorest and most vulnerable. Oldham suffered extended periods of lock-down and studies have shown that pupils have fallen behind, losing progress in maths and reading. Progress, about which Oldham is rightfully proud, in reducing the gap in attainment between Oldham’s children and those nationally, has been jeopardised. It has been confirmed in national research that the poorest pupils have lost more learning than the average.
  • Prolonged absence from social contact with peers and adults in school has negatively affected the mental health of children and young people.  
  • Attendance in early years settings in Oldham, as more generally in the country, has fallen during the pandemic. This has implications for their development and school readiness.

 

  •  

This Council therefore resolves:

  • To urge the Government to value and invest in all our children, so they are supported to develop well, to learn, succeed, and go on to have bright futures. 
  • To write to the Prime Minister and call on the Government to scale up its ambition for all our children in their early years, in school and in adolescence, to provide the resources needed to ensure that no child is left behind by putting in the investment called for by its own former Education Recovery Commissioner. This investment must include proper provision for pupil and early years premiums, ensuring access to school lunch throughout the year, and to sports and social activities which promote health and mental wellbeing.
  • To continue to use the resources available to the Council for the development of all Oldham’s children – in school, in college and in early years settings – and to encourage families to do what they can to promote the sound development of their children.  

 

Motion 2

 

Councillor Hulme to MOVE and Councillor Jabbar to SECOND:

 

Climate and Ecological Emergency (CEE) Bill

This Council notes

  1. the ongoing climate crisis is the biggest challenge we face in our world. Climate breakdown is causing global temperatures and sea levels to continue to rise and we are experiencing  ...  view the full agenda text for item 11.

Minutes:

Motion 1  - Recovery in Education and Young Children’s Development

 

Councillor Mushtaq MOVED and Councillor Moores SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

This Council notes that:

 

·         Sir Kevan Collins, appointed by the Prime Minister as the Government’s Education Recovery Commissioner judged that some £15bn was needed to repair the damage done to the nation’s pupils because of Covid.

·         On 2nd June the Government published its plans for education recovery after the pandemic. Its offer, £1.4bn, falls far short and is completely inadequate to build back better from the pandemic and have an education system that supports high standards and strong mental health for everyone.

·         The Government’s funding is intended mainly for tutors for children in schools. Other essential support, especially for disadvantaged children is not provided for.

·         Moreover, there is no mention of support to ensure good development of children in their early years.

 

This Council further notes that

 

·         Evidence from research for the Government supports the necessity for greater resources for children in Oldham, who are among the poorest and most vulnerable. Oldham suffered extended periods of lock-down and studies have shown that pupils have fallen behind, losing progress in maths and reading. Progress, about which Oldham is rightfully proud, in reducing the gap in attainment between Oldham’s children and those nationally, has been jeopardised. It has been confirmed in national research that the poorest pupils have lost more learning than the average.

·         Prolonged absence from social contact with peers and adults in school has negatively affected the mental health of children and young people. 

·         Attendance in early years settings in Oldham, as more generally in the country, has fallen during the pandemic. This has implications for their development and school readiness.

 

           

This Council therefore resolves:

 

·         To urge the Government to value and invest in all our children, so they are supported to develop well, to learn, succeed, and go on to have bright futures.

·         To write to the Prime Minister and call on the Government to scale up its ambition for all our children in their early years, in school and in adolescence, to provide the resources needed to ensure that no child is left behind by putting in the investment called for by its own former Education Recovery Commissioner. This investment must include proper provision for pupil and early years premiums, ensuring access to school lunch throughout the year, and to sports and social activities which promote health and mental wellbeing.

·         To continue to use the resources available to the Council for the development of all Oldham’s children – in school, in college and in early years settings – and to encourage families to do what they can to promote the sound development of their children.

 

Councillor Mushtaq spoke on the Motion.

Councillor Moores spoke on the Motion.

Councillor H Gloster spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Sheldon spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Ali spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Sykes spoke in support of the Motion.

 

Councillor Mushtaq exercised his right of reply.

 

On  ...  view the full minutes text for item 11.

12.

Notice of Opposition Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

 

Councillor Al-Hamdani to MOVE and Councillor Hamblett to SECOND:

Pension Fund Divestment from Fossil Fuels

This Council recognises that:

  • Burning fossil fuels contributes significantly to global warming, jeopardising the stability of our climate upon which our well-being and economy depend. Such activity also has a negative impact upon air quality and so public health.
  • Research demonstrates that 80% or more of the world’s proven fossil fuel reserves will have to remain unburnt if we are to have a reasonable chance of keeping global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the globally agreed target for climate change mitigation.
  • Since 80% of fossil fuels must remain in the ground, the reserves of the fossil fuel industry risk becoming ‘stranded assets’ with little or no value – representing a substantial financial risk for those that invest in them.
  • Greater Manchester Pension Fund currently has around £1.7 billion invested in the oil, coal and gas industries. This is environmentally and financially irresponsible.
  • To date, over 1,100 institutions representing over $14 trillion in assets have committed to divest from fossil-fuel companies.  These include the World Council of Churches, the Irish state, New York City, the British Medical Association and a growing number of UK local authority pension funds.
  • As a local authority with a commitment to become carbon-neutral by 2025, it is illogical for Oldham Council to make employer contributions towards a pension fund that is committed to investments in fossil-fuel companies.

 

Council resolves:

  • Not to invest directly in fossil fuel companies.
  • To mandate its representative to the Greater Manchester Pension Fund Board to call for the adoption of Responsible Investment policies which:
  • Immediately freeze any new investment in the top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel companies;
  • By the end of this year, divest from direct ownership of companies involved in coal mining;
  • Within two years, divest from direct ownership of all fossil fuel companies, along with any commingled funds that include any fossil fuel public equities and corporate bonds;
  • Set out an approach to quantifying and addressing climate change risks affecting all other investments, and
  • Focus future investments on areas that minimise climate change risk and, where possible, invest in local climate solutions that will benefit fund members, their families and the wider community.

 

  • To ask the Chief Executive to write to the Leaders and Chief Executives of the other 9 Greater Manchester local authorities outlining this Council’s position and asking for their support.

 

Motion 2

 

Councillor Murphy to MOVE and Councillor C Gloster to SECOND:

Pavement Parking: Options for Change

This Council notes that:

·         Pavement parking can pose a hazard to pedestrians, especially people with sight loss, parents with pushchairs, wheelchair users and other disabled people.

·         People with sight loss are especially at risk as they can be forced into the road and faced with oncoming traffic that they cannot see.

·         Pavements are not designed to take the weight of vehicles and so surfaces can become damaged or subside, presenting a further hazard for pedestrians, particularly  ...  view the full agenda text for item 12.

Minutes:

Motion 1 – Pension Fund Divestment from Fossil Fuels

 

Councillor Al-Hamdani MOVED and Councillor Hamblett SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

 

This Council recognises that:

 

·         Burning fossil fuels contributes significantly to global warming, jeopardising the stability of our climate upon which our well-being and economy depend. Such activity also has a negative impact upon air quality and so public health.

·         Research demonstrates that 80% or more of the world’s proven fossil fuel reserves will have to remain unburnt if we are to have a reasonable chance of keeping global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the globally agreed target for climate change mitigation.

·         Since 80% of fossil fuels must remain in the ground, the reserves of the fossil fuel industry risk becoming ‘stranded assets’ with little or no value – representing a substantial financial risk for those that invest in them.

·         Greater Manchester Pension Fund currently has around £1.7 billion invested in the oil, coal and gas industries. This is environmentally and financially irresponsible.

·         To date, over 1,100 institutions representing over $14 trillion in assets have committed to divest from fossil-fuel companies.  These include the World Council of Churches, the Irish state, New York City, the British Medical Association and a growing number of UK local authority pension funds.

·         As a Local Authority with a commitment to become carbon-neutral by 2025, it is illogical for Oldham Council to make employer contributions towards a pension fund that is committed to investments in fossil-fuel companies.

 

Council resolves:

 

·         Not to invest directly in fossil fuel companies.

·         To mandate its representative to the Greater Manchester Pension Fund Board to call for the adoption of Responsible Investment policies which:

·         Immediately freeze any new investment in the top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel companies;

·         By the end of this year, divest from direct ownership of companies involved in coal mining;

·         Within two years, divest from direct ownership of all fossil fuel companies, along with any commingled funds that include any fossil fuel public equities and corporate bonds;

·         Set out an approach to quantifying and addressing climate change risks affecting all other investments, and

·         Focus future investments on areas that minimise climate change risk and, where possible, invest in local climate solutions that will benefit fund members, their families and the wider community.

 

·         To ask the Chief Executive to write to the Leaders and Chief Executives of the other 9 Greater Manchester local authorities outlining this Council’s position and asking for their support.

 

Councillor Al-Hamdani spoke on the motion.

Councillor Hamblett spoke on the motion.

 

AMENDMENT

 

Councillor Jabbar MOVED and Councillor Hulme SECONDED the following AMENDMENT:

 

This Council recognises that:

 

·         Burning fossil fuels contributes significantly to global warming, jeopardising the stability of our climate upon which our well-being and economy depend. Such activity also has a negative impact upon air quality and so public health.

 

·         Research demonstrates that 80% or more of the world’s proven fossil fuel reserves will have to remain unburnt if we are to have a reasonable chance of keeping global warming to well below  ...  view the full minutes text for item 12.

13.

UPDATE ON ACTIONS FROM COUNCIL pdf icon PDF 162 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Director of Legal Services which informed members of actions taken following previous Council meetings and provided feedback on issues raised at those meetings.

 

Copies of amended appendices in relation to the report were circulated at the meeting.

 

RESOLVED – That the actions regarding motions and issues from previous Council meetings be agreed and that the correspondence, updates and amended appendices provided be noted.

 

 

14.

COVID-19 RECOVERY STRATEGY 2021 - 2022 pdf icon PDF 258 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Jabbar SECONDED a report recommending that the Covid-19 Recovery Strategy 2021-2022 be adopted by the Council as attached to the report at Appendix 1.

 

Members were reminded that as a Co-operative Council, Oldham was committed to tackling the impact of Covid-19 and protecting our most vulnerable residents and communities.  Members were also advised that building on the learning so far, and the anticipated events to come, a comprehensive Recovery Strategy had been developed, which would help to shape approach and vision for Oldham over the next 18 months whilst continuing to respond to an ongoing critical incident.

 

It was reported that the objectives and approach to the Recovery Strategy were rooted in our vision, the Oldham Model, ensuring as we adapt to a changing world that we remained focused on building thriving communities, an inclusive economy and to delivery co-operatively.

 

It was reported that to develop the new Covid-19 Recovery strategy priorities, consultation had taken place at Directorate Management Team Meetings (DMT), with Cabinet, and through engagement with Overview and Scrutiny.

 

Key priority areas in the Strategy were reported as:

 

Driving equality, Investing in quality housing, Championing a green recovery, Creating and protecting jobs and supporting businesses, Prioritising education and skills and Promoting health and wellbeing and supporting the most vulnerable.

 

Details of each of the above priority areas were outlined within the report.  It was reported that each of the above focus areas formed a key strand of the Covid-19 Recovery Strategy, with individual actions attached to each priority area.  The Strategy reflected the difficult and challenging times ahead and the opportunities that were arising as we recover from the pandemic as Team Oldham.  The Strategy also set out how we can embrace the ‘new normal’ to build a stronger local economy, increase community resilience and public participation, support our local health system, and support our most vulnerable residents.

 

Details of monitoring of the Recovery Plan were outlined within the report and Members were advised that following Full Council approval, the Recovery Strategy would be launched, ensuring that the priorities are embedded across Team Oldham.  This would include creating a full communications and engagement programme, both within Team Oldham, with stakeholders and residents.  An online tool would also be created to regularly update on progress.

 

The financial implications of delivering the Strategy were also outlined within the report. 

 

Councillor Jabbar extended thanks and appreciation to all staff and NHS partners and volunteers who had dedicated their time and hard work to support the residents of the Borough to get us through the pandemic period.  

 

Questions from Councillors:

 

Councillor Hamblett:

 

Supporting patients with long-COVID

 

“ equal my thanks to all the staff and Members within the Council and Oldham Cares and all health teams.  On Page 29, under Driving Equality, I would like to see some commitment to providing support to the many residents in our borough who will be suffering from the impact of long-COVID.

 

Last month, the Government-funded Reach-2 study revealed that more  ...  view the full minutes text for item 14.

15.

Districts and Lead Members - Changes to the Constitution pdf icon PDF 541 KB

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report setting out proposed constitutional amendments to realign the Council’s Districts, and to update the role of the District Leader Member.

 

The proposed changes were outlined within the report at Appendix 1.

 

RESOLVED – That Council approves the changes to the Constitution proposed comprising as follows:

 

1.    Part 2, Article 10.1 – in order to recognise realignment of District geographies; and;

2.    Part 2, Article 10.2/10.3 – relating to the role of the District Lead Member.

 

 

 

16.

Constitution - Consequential Amendments pdf icon PDF 226 KB

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report highlighting, on grounds of good governance, consequential and other amendments to the Council Constitution required following the Annual Meeting of the Council held on 19th May 2021.

 

Details of the Constitution Consequential Amendments were outlined within the report.

 

RESOLVED –

 

1.    That the report and the consequential amendments to Part 3 “Responsibility for Functions” to the Constitution be noted; and

2.    The revisions to Part 2 “Articles” and Part 3 “Responsibility for Functions” referenced in this report be approved; and

3.    Any further consequential amendments arising from this report be delegated to the Director of Legal.