Agenda and minutes

Council
Wednesday, 3rd November, 2021 6.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber, Civic Centre, Oldham, West Street, Oldham, OL1 1NL

Contact: Liz Drogan 

Items
No. Item

1.

To receive apologies for absence

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors Abid, Hulme, Leach and C Phythian.

2.

To order that the Minutes of the Special meeting of Council held on 8th September 2021 and the Ordinary Meeting held on 8th September 2021 be signed as a correct record pdf icon PDF 187 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

RESOLVED That the minutes of the Council meetings held on 8th September 2021 be approved as correct records.

 

3.

To receive declarations of interest in any matter to be determined at the meeting

Minutes:

Councillor Garry declared a pecuniary interest at Item 10d by virtue of her husband’s employment with Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor Chris Gloster declared a personal interest at Item 10d by virtue of his receipt of an occupational pension from Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor Hazel Gloster declared a personal interest at Item 10d by virtue of her husband’s receipt of an occupational pension from Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor Surjan declared a pecuniary interest in Item 13.

Councillor Hamblett declared a personal interest at Item 10d in relation to MioCare, by virtue of being a Council nominee on the Board.

Councillor Chauhan declared a personal interest at Item 10d in relation to MioCare, by virtue of being a Council nominee on the Board.

Councillor S Bashforth declared a personal interest at Item 10d in relation to MioCare, by virtue of being a Council nominee on the Board.

4.

To deal with matters which the Mayor considers to be urgent business

Minutes:

There were no items of urgent business.

5.

To receive communications relating to the business of the Council

Minutes:

The Mayor made reference to the recent death of Sir David Amess MP following a knife attack during a surgery at his constituency in Leigh-on-Sea and the Council held a minute’s silence in his memory.

6.

Greater Manchester Policing Plan

Minutes:

Chief Superintendent Chris Bowen addressed the meeting.

 

The Council was informed that he had been in post for five weeks. He would be focussing on the future of policing in Oldham.

 

He had come to a passionate workforce that wanted to make a difference to the communities of Greater Manchester (GM), that needed to pull in the same direction to make things better.

 

GMP would make five promises to the people of GM:-

1.    Respond to incidents and emergencies

2.    Investigate and solve crime

3.    Prevent, reduce crime, reduce harm and reduce anti-social behaviour

4.    Deliver outstanding service

5.    Build back public trust and confidence

 

Delivery of the first four promises would help to deliver the fifth.

 

Councillor Shah asked how it was intended to deliver promise five and build trust back within communities?

 

Chief Superintendent Bowen responded that delivery of the first four promises would deliver the fifth. The force had to prove to the people that promises 1-4 were actually being delivered and the statistics would show this. It was accepted that there would be times when things were not right, and these would be identified and lessons learned to stop it happening again.

 

Councillor Sheldon welcomed the new Chief Superintendent.

 

Councillor Sykes asked how it would be possible to return to community policing and what three things would have visibly improved for Oldham residents in twelve months time?

 

Chief Superintendent Bowen responded that he was passionate about neighbourhood policing and its benefit. A neighbourhood policing review was currently being undertaken and it would ensure every area had a named police officer. Three things to demonstrate improvement:-

1.    Get to victims quickly, respond appropriately and deal with properly

2.    Free up neighbourhood policing to do true problem-solving policing

3.    Increase visibility of neighbourhood policing

This would require time to implement new procedures and he would happily come back to provide updates to inform the Council on progress.

 

Councillor Hobin welcomed the new Chief Superintendent.

 

The Mayor thanked Chief Superintendent Bowen for his attendance.

 

 

7.

To receive and note petitions received relating to the business of the Council

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There are no peitions to note.

Minutes:

There were no petitions received to be noted.

8.

Leader's Annual Statement

Minutes:

The Leader of the Council, Councillor Arooj Shah, delivered her first Annual Statement. 

 

The Leader reminded the Council of her priorities, as set out in May 2021.

·         Getting back to basics by investing in cleaning up streets, taking action on littering and flytipping and restoring a sense of pride in neighbourhoods.

·         Steering the town’s economic recovery from the impact of the pandemic – supporting local businesses, creating jobs and attracting investment and funding. At the heart of this was the delivery of key regeneration schemes, both in the town centre and elsewhere.

·         Reconnecting with local people, to acknowledge that many residents felt distant from the decisions made about their area and from how their local services were run, and to do something to put that right.

·         Continuing to support the most vulnerable and to drive out inequality and unfairness wherever it existed.

 

The recruitment of a new Chief Executive, Harry Catherall, had made a real difference to the culture and approach in the organisation. He shared the Leader’s passion for putting residents at the centre of everything the Council did and for providing great quality local services and was already working to drive that culture through every council service and to every council employee. Thanks were given to the Chief Executive for what he had already done for Oldham and for the amazing things he would continue to achieve for local people.

 

The scale of the challenges that Oldham and its people faced and the role of elected members in addressing those challenges was acknowledged

.

The Leader referred to the difficulties of the last eighteen months. Many local people felt the impact of the pandemic on their jobs and their wages as well as their health, and rising costs for basic necessities like food and fuel were pushing more people into poverty. The recent cut to universal credit had served to push people further towards financial crisis. Young people had seen their education significantly disrupted by the pandemic, and more disrupted in Oldham than other areas of the country. Public services had been stretched to breaking point through sheer demand– hospitals, ambulance service and GPs and also services like welfare rights and other support teams. The pandemic had increased the number of young people and families needing support from safeguarding services to keep them safe.

 

The Leader highlighted that, at such times, Councils and the services they provided were vital and mattered more than ever to local communities. To support them, the Council needed fair funding through sustainable levels of funding that acknowledged the level of need in different areas. It was not true levelling up to ask local council-tax payers to bear the brunt of the impact of the pandemic on local services like adult social care through increased ‘precepts’. It was not levelling up to ensure that areas with high levels of need were left with the stark choices of cutting local services, selling off local assets or heaping the financial burden onto already struggling local taxpayers.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8.

9.

Youth Council

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There is no Youth Council business to consider.

Minutes:

There were no items submitted by the Youth Council.

10.

Questions Time

10a

Public Questions

(time limit 15 Minutes)

Minutes:

1.    Question received from Robert Barnes

The time limit for Public Questions has been reduced to 15 minutes by this administration. Would the Council Leader give serious consideration to restoring the time limit to 30 minutes? In addition, at the moment there is no right of reply to the question that has been asked. In the interests of openness, transparency, accountability and democracy, will the Council Leader give serious consideration to allow the public a right of reply of two minutes to an answer they have been given by an Elected Member? Elected Members are servants of the people. Isn't it time that this administration acknowledged that?

 

Councillor Shah, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member

for Economic and Social Reform replied that it was important to say that every public question that was submitted to Full Council received an answer from the Leader or another Cabinet Member and they tried to fit as many answers into the meeting as they could. Any that they did not get to received a written response that was also published on the Council’s website.

By extending time for public questions the Council would however, have to reduce time for other urgent and important business that it had to get through or reduce time for elected representatives to raise issues or queries about their wards.

A right of reply could be considered, but this would inevitably reduce the number of public questions that could be addressed in any meeting.

Decisions about changes to Full Council timings were made by a cross-party group made up of the Leader and fellow group leaders and this could be taken to a future meeting for discussion.

As a Conservative candidate for a councillor position, Mr Barnes could also raise this with Councillor Sheldon, who could also bring it to that meeting for discussion.

 

2.    Question received from Julie and George Heywood

My question is to the leader of oldham council. Does she think it is OK for ombc to block and blank my dad's concerns, he is 89 yrs old has been waiting for a call back since June last year!! Also blocked from I love oldham page on Facebook. complaints had me ring my complaint then email then put it in writing to be then told "i'm out of time" do you think something needs to be done to prevent us the public from having our concerns and complaints blocked and blanked.Thankyou

 

Councillor Shah, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member

for Economic and Social Reform replied that the Council’s social media channels aimed to provide an informative, engaging and inclusive space for all residents of Oldham. The Council would answer questions, provide useful information, and signpost residents to the services and departments they need.

Posts that directed criticism to the Council were not usually removed. In fact, we welcomed – and encouraged – feedback from our residents. We were happy to be told where we had got it wrong.

However, there was a zero tolerance approach  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10a

10b

Questions to Leader and Cabinet

(time limit 30 minutes)

Minutes:

Councillor Sykes, Leader of the Liberal Democratic Group:

 

Question 1 – Marking Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee

 

“My first question tonight relates to the concerns the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee next year.

 

First and foremost, I hope all Council will join me in wishing her majesty a full and speedy recovery from her recent spell of being under the weather.

 

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II will in 2022 have been our noble sovereign and Head of the Commonwealth for 70 years, and there are rightly calls from every quarter that this magnificent and unsurpassed achievement in public service be properly celebrated in every corner of our land.

 

In June, I wrote to Councillor Chadderton as Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, requesting that rose varieties named after Her Majesty the Queen and her late husband HRH Prince Phillip should be planted side-by-side in Oldham’s major public parks and gardens as a tribute to our Royal Family.

 

I also copied in Councillor Hulme as Council Tree Champion as I suggested that we get our borough’s residents involved in a tree planting programme to mark the Platinum Jubilee, with schools and community groups planting trees in our parks and gardens.

 

On 2 June 2022, the actual date of the anniversary, localities in the UK and across the Commonwealth are being invited to light beacons, to arrange for town criers to make proclamations, and at the setting of the sun local pipe bands will play a unique tune specially composed for the occasion.

 

We shall no doubt also receive many calls from our Borough’s residents for permission to hold street parties and other celebratory events.

 

So, can the Leader please tell me what is being done to prepare for this momentous event, and will she also consider appointing a senior member of her Administration as a Champion to co-ordinate the effort?”

 

Councillor Shah, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Economic and Social Reform, replied that there were discussion taking places and proposals being put forward, which would be shared when they were finalised. She agreed that the Jubilee should be celebrated in the dignified way it warranted.

 

Question 2 – Princes Gate turns Seven

 

“For my second question tonight, I want to return to a subject that has now become a fixture in the annual Council calendar.

 

No, I am not referring to the Oldham Big Bang which explodes once more tomorrow night.  Instead, it is that annual question that I as Opposition Leader ask about Prince’s Gate.

 

For once more this month we shall arrive at yet another anniversary of the announcement by a former Council Leader, now thrice removed, of the supposed ‘gamechanger’ that was to be Prince’s Gate.  And this year this farce turns seven.

 

I would have brought a birthday cake with candles to share, but we have yet to even see the birth.

 

For Princes’ Gate has had a gestation period over four times longer than an elephant. (That’s 18 to 22 months by the way).

On 19 November 2014,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10b

10c

Questions on Cabinet Minutes pdf icon PDF 231 KB

(time limit 15 minutes)

 

23rd August 2021

13th September 2021

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council was requested to note the minutes of the Cabinet meetings held on the undermentioned dates and to receive any questions on any items within the minutes from members of the Council who were not members of the Cabinet, and receive responses from Cabinet members. The minutes of the Cabinet meetings held on 23rd August 2021 and 13th September 2021 were

submitted.

 

Members raised the following questions:-

 

Councillor C Gloster asked the following question in relation to Cabinet 23rd August 2021 – Item 8 – Towns Fund Grant Acceptance

The £24 million is to be split between four big capital projects. Projects of this size either fail to materialise, complete in a different form to that envisaged or goes grossly over budget. Does the relevant Cabinet Member believe that we will be able to deliver these projects without any of the deficiencies outlined, bearing in mind the advice from the Peer Review Group not to be over-ambitious in the area of capital projects?

 

Councillor Shah, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Economic and Social Reform responded that the projects are all costed in the Capital Programme. If there was not confidence, the plans would not have been put forward. Concerns were understandable, which was why conversations were being had to consult and make sure everyone was on board. It would be valuable if all Members could join in instilling confidence in the residents and helping them to understand the projects were for them, about them and guided by them.

 

Councillor C Gloster asked a supplementary question as to the concerns raised by the Peer Review Group.

 

Councillor Shah replied that she had responded to this.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.    The minutes of the Cabinet meetings held on 23rd August 2021 and 13th September be noted.

2.    The questions and responses provided be noted.

10d

Questions on Joint Arrangements pdf icon PDF 260 KB

(time limit 15 minutes)

 

GM Waste and Recycling Committee

13th July 2021

GM Health and Social Care Partnership

30th July 2021

Health and Wellbeing Board

22nd June 2021

GM Transport Committee

20th August 2021

GMCA

25th June 2021

10th September 2021

Miocare

14th July 2021

National Peak Park Authority

2nd July 2021

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council was asked to note the minutes of the following Joint Authority and Partnership meetings and the relevant spokespersons to respond to questions from Members.

 

The minutes of the Joint Authorities and Partnerships were

submitted as follows:

 

GM Waste and Recycling

Committee

13th July 2021

GM Health and Social Care

Partnership

30th July 2021

Health and Wellbeing Board

22nd June 2021

GM Transport Committee

20th August 2021

GMCA

25th June 2021

10th September 2021

Miocare

14th July 2021

National Peak Park Authority

2nd July 2021

 

Members raised the following questions:

 

1.    Councillor Toor asked in relation to page 91 GMCA 114/ 21 Clean Air Plan Update

Can the Leader please clarify and explain the reasons for Oldham participating in the Greater Manchester Clean Air Plan? 

 

Councillor Shah, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member

for Economic and Social Reform responded that working together through the GM Combined Authority, local coundils, including Oldham were under direction from the Government to introduce the Clean Air Plan and subsequent Clean Air Zone in the shortest possible time. This was to comply with legal Nitrogen Dioxide limits on local roads. All GM Authorities (the nine Labour councils and the Conservative Council in Bolton) had approved the GM Clean Air Plan and category ‘C’ Clean Air Zone because they had no choice bu tto act, not only because they had been told to do so, but also because many people in the city region were suffering ill health and even early death due to dirty air. However, the funding package provided by the Government was significantly less than required to install the infrastructure needed, support local businesses affected and to pay for the running of the scheme by the Government, meaning that, once again, the cost was left to be picked up by those who lived and worked in Greater Manchester. Alongside other GM Leaders, she was continuing to lobby Government for fair funding for the running of this scheme.

 

2.    Councillor Hamblett asked in relation to Health and Wellbeing Board 22/6/21 Item 8, pages 2-3 – Healthwatch Oldham Report – COVID-19: Your Health and Care Experiences Report

With reference to the Healthwatch report two issues that are repeatedly raised by constituents with elected members are

1. The difficulty in actually getting through to medical centre reception staff by telephone, with long wait times, calls frequently being cut off and calls not being returned,

2. The inability of patients to actually access in person appointments with GPs.

What is the Health and Wellbeing Board doing to address these issues of real public concern with medical professionals and surgery staff, and when can our constituents expect to see real improvements in the service?

 

Councillor Chauhan, Cabinet Member for Health and Social

Care responded that the issue was under remit of NHS Oldham and a detailed response had been requested which would be provided to the Councillor. This was a national issue which had multiple causes including funding. An article had recently been published where the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10d

11.

Notice of Administration Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

Councillor Shah to MOVE and Councillor Chadderton to SECOND:

Violence Against Women and Girls

This Council notes the shocking prevalence of violence against women and girls, most recently made visible by the appalling murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa. This is fuelled by a toxic culture of misogyny, with a recent report from the APPG for UN Women finding that 71% of women of all ages in the UK have experienced some form of sexual harassment in a public space.

Tackling the violence and misogyny in society is a long-term challenge that requires a collective response, from the online companies that enable the sharing of harmful and abusive content to employers not doing enough to address inequality in the workplace.

This Council welcomes the recent publication of Greater Manchester’s Gender-Based Violence Strategy, which sets out a ten-year plan that includes every part of our society. In Oldham we also take a partnership approach to addressing gender-based violence, aiming to prevent future abuse (including by educating young people about healthy relationships), addressing the behaviour of those who have perpetrated abuse and providing support to survivors. The Council is looking to strengthen this approach further, with a new Domestic Abuse Strategy following work with the charity SafeLives to review Oldham’s current activity.

Where violence is committed against women and girls, it is important we have a robust response from our police to deliver justice. This Council notes the appalling statistic revealed by the Government’s End-to-End Rape Review that only 1.6% of rape cases brought to the police result in a charge.

The fresh approach brought by the new Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police since his appointment is important if we are to rebuild faith that justice will be served. The disbanding of GMP’s Serious Sexual Offences Unit in 2017 as part of a transformation in favour of omni-competence raised questions about the priorities of the force at the time.

This Council resolves to ask the Chief Executive to write to Chief Constable Stephen Watson:

·         Welcoming the improvement plan he has produced for Greater Manchester Police, including a recognition of the importance of Think Victim training, and acknowledgement that there has been a lack of focus on support for those most vulnerable.

·         Welcoming the move away from the notion of omni-competence, and requesting information about what this will mean for specialist support for the victims of sexual violence

·         Requesting information about what training officers generally are given to support the victims of sexual violence given the reports of women being treated poorly by non-specialist officers of GMP in the past

This Council also resolves to work cross-party to promote the consultation on Oldham’s Domestic Abuse Strategy, which is published this week.

 

Motion 2

Councillor Jabbar to MOVE and Councillor Hulme to SECOND:

COP26

This Council notes the 26th UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), taking place in Glasgow, which aims to:

·         Secure global net zero emissions by the middle of the century, thereby sustaining the  ...  view the full agenda text for item 11.

Minutes:

Motion 1

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Chadderton SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

Motion 1 - Violence Against Women and Girls

 

This Council notes the shocking prevalence of violence against women and girls, most recently made visible by the appalling murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa. This is fuelled by a toxic culture of misogyny, with a recent report from the APPG for UN Women finding that 71% of women of all ages in the UK have experienced some form of sexual harassment in a public space.

Tackling the violence and misogyny in society is a long-term challenge that requires a collective response, from the online companies that enable the sharing of harmful and abusive content to employers not doing enough to address inequality in the workplace.

This Council welcomes the recent publication of Greater Manchester’s Gender-Based Violence Strategy, which sets out a ten-year plan that includes every part of our society. In Oldham we also take a partnership approach to addressing gender-based violence, aiming to prevent future abuse (including by educating young people about healthy relationships), addressing the behaviour of those who have perpetrated abuse and providing support to survivors. The Council is looking to strengthen this approach further, with a new Domestic Abuse Strategy following work with the charity SafeLives to review Oldham’s current activity.

Where violence is committed against women and girls, it is important we have a robust response from our police to deliver justice. This Council notes the appalling statistic revealed by the Government’s End-to-End Rape Review that only 1.6% of rape cases brought to the police result in a charge.

The fresh approach brought by the new Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police since his appointment is important if we are to rebuild faith that justice will be served. The disbanding of GMP’s Serious Sexual Offences Unit in 2017 as part of a transformation in favour of omni-competence raised questions about the priorities of the force at the time.

This Council resolves to ask the Chief Executive to write to Chief Constable Stephen Watson:

·         Welcoming the improvement plan he has produced for Greater Manchester Police, including a recognition of the importance of Think Victim training, and acknowledgement that there has been a lack of focus on support for those most vulnerable.

·         Welcoming the move away from the notion of omni-competence, and requesting information about what this will mean for specialist support for the victims of sexual violence

·         Requesting information about what training officers generally are given to support the victims of sexual violence given the reports of women being treated poorly by non-specialist officers of GMP in the past

This Council also resolves to work cross-party to promote the consultation on Oldham’s Domestic Abuse Strategy, which is published this week.

 

Councillor Toor spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Mushtaq spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Roberts spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Al-Hamdani spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Goodwin spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Williamson spoke in  ...  view the full minutes text for item 11.

12.

Notice of Opposition Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

Councillor Murphy to MOVE and Councillor H Gloster to SECOND:

Save Our Rivers

This Council notes that:

·         Every river in England is now polluted beyond legal limits; with the Environment Agency rating only 14% as Good in 2019.

·         Our local rivers, the Beal, Irk, Medlock, and Tame all failed the most recent test for chemical pollution carried out by the agency.

·         This chemical pollution is mostly caused by sewage discharges from water companies and the run-offs of nutrients from farms.

·         The Rivers Irk and Tame are particularly threatened by further sewage-water discharges.

·         Government funding to the Environment Agency to monitor river quality and regulate farms and water companies has dropped 75% since 2010/11.

·         Farms are now almost never inspected, water quality is rarely tested, and water companies can pump raw sewage into rivers with virtual impunity.

·         In addition, tyre rubber particles, metals from brake pads, and hydrocarbons from vehicle emissions, wash off road surfaces and into rivers, endangering wildlife and potentially introducing carcinogenic material into the water supply.

Council believes that, as host nation of COP-26 (the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021, the UK Government should commit to:

·         Restoring Environment Agency budgets

·         Increasing inspections of water companies and farms, and rigorously prosecuting offenders.

·         Funding local and highways authorities to introduce treatment systems to prevent road pollutants from entering our water courses.

Council resolves to request the Chief Executive write to:

·         The Environment Minister calling for the Government to make these commitments as host nation of COP-26.

·         The Chief Executive of United Utilities calling for further urgent action to address the impact of waste-water discharges on our local rivers, particularly the Irk and Tame.

·         The Regional Director of the National Farmers’ Union requesting clarification on the action being taken locally by farmers to prevent the run-off of nutrients into our rivers.

·         The charity River Action expressing this Council’s support for their campaign to restore the health of Britain’s rivers.

With our three MPs to be copied into this correspondence and asked for their support.

 

Motion 2

Councillor Lancaster to MOVE and Councillor Woodvine to SECOND:

South Pennines National Park

This Council notes that: 

  • the UK Government’s commitment to protect 30% of our land by 2030, an ambition now shared by all G7 Members following the recent Summit in Cornwall, is very welcome 
  • the South Pennines, covering much of Saddleworth, Crompton Moor and Moorside in our Borough, ought to be included in any additional protected land allocation and can significantly contribute to meeting this national 30% target 
  • South Pennines Park (formerly ‘Pennine Prospects’) and other groups campaigning for a Regional Park for the South Pennines have undertaken significant and applaudable work, but this proposal would not provide equal status and support as is enjoyed by the other ten existing National Parks in England 
  • the South Pennines was first considered for National Park designation in the original Hobhouse Committee of seventy years ago, and its  ...  view the full agenda text for item 12.

Minutes:

Motion 1

 

Councillor Murphy MOVED and Councillor H Gloster SECONDED the

following MOTION:

 

Motion 1 - Save Our Rivers

 

This Council notes that:

·         Every river in England is now polluted beyond legal limits; with the Environment Agency rating only 14% as Good in 2019.

·         Our local rivers, the Beal, Irk, Medlock, and Tame all failed the most recent test for chemical pollution carried out by the agency.

·         This chemical pollution is mostly caused by sewage discharges from water companies and the run-offs of nutrients from farms.

·         The Rivers Irk and Tame are particularly threatened by further sewage-water discharges.

·         Government funding to the Environment Agency to monitor river quality and regulate farms and water companies has dropped 75% since 2010/11.

·         Farms are now almost never inspected, water quality is rarely tested, and water companies can pump raw sewage into rivers with virtual impunity.

·         In addition, tyre rubber particles, metals from brake pads, and hydrocarbons from vehicle emissions, wash off road surfaces and into rivers, endangering wildlife and potentially introducing carcinogenic material into the water supply.

Council believes that, as host nation of COP-26 (the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021, the UK Government should commit to:

·         Restoring Environment Agency budgets

·         Increasing inspections of water companies and farms, and rigorously prosecuting offenders.

·         Funding local and highways authorities to introduce treatment systems to prevent road pollutants from entering our water courses.

Council resolves to request the Chief Executive write to:

·         The Environment Minister calling for the Government to make these commitments as host nation of COP-26.

·         The Chief Executive of United Utilities calling for further urgent action to address the impact of waste-water discharges on our local rivers, particularly the Irk and Tame.

·         The Regional Director of the National Farmers’ Union requesting clarification on the action being taken locally by farmers to prevent the run-off of nutrients into our rivers.

·         The charity River Action expressing this Council’s support for their campaign to restore the health of Britain’s rivers.

With our three MPs to be copied into this correspondence and asked for their support.

Councillor Jabbar spoke in favour of the motion.

Councillor Murphy exercised his right of reply.

On being put to the vote, the MOTION was CARRIED.

RESOLVED that:

The Chief Executive be requested to write to:

  • The Environment Minister calling for the Government to make these commitments as host nation of COP-26.
  • The Chief Executive of United Utilities calling for further urgent action to address the impact of waste-water discharges on our local rivers, particularly the Irk and Tame.
  • The Regional Director of the National Farmers’ Union requesting clarification on the action being taken locally by farmers to prevent the run-off of nutrients into our rivers.
  • The charity River Action expressing this Council’s support for their campaign to restore the health of Britain’s rivers.

With the three MPs to be copied into this correspondence and asked for their support.

Motion 2

Councillor Lancaster to MOVED and Councillor Woodvine  ...  view the full minutes text for item 12.

13.

Covid-19 Response Update pdf icon PDF 351 KB

Minutes:

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Chauhan SECONDED a

report of the Strategic Director of Communities & Reform which provided an update on how the Council and its partners continue to monitor and manage the impact of COVID-19 in Oldham.

 

COVID-19 was still circulating across the UK and new cases were seen in Oldham every day. The report summarised the Council’s activity, demonstrating how it collectively managed and prevented the spread of COVID-19 across Oldham communities.

 

It was PROPOSED and SECONDED that questions be submitted and responded to in writing.

 

On being put to the vote, the PROPOSAL was CARRIED.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.    The content of the report be noted.

2.    Questions be submitted and responded to in writing.

14.

Update on Actions from Council pdf icon PDF 148 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Sykes SECONDED a report of the Director of Legal Services, which informed members of actions taken following the meeting of the Council on 8th September 2021.

 

RESOLVED that the actions regarding motions and issues from the meeting of the Council on 8th September 2021 be noted.

15.

District Leads 2021-22 pdf icon PDF 544 KB

Report to follow.

Minutes:

Councillor Chadderton MOVED and Councillor Shah SECONDED a report of the Head of Democratic Services which asked the Council to consider appointing District Leads for each new geographical District and a Deputy District Lead in North and East Districts and the recommendation that the District Leads receive an allowance.

 

Members were informed that, ss part of the development of the new Place-Based Working model, the Council and partner services had moved to alignment of provision around a new set of five geographies. Council agreed to the changes on 14th July 2021.  

 

To facilitate the role of Elected Members in the Place-Based model, a new District Lead was required for each of the new 5 Districts. A Deputy in North District and East District would also be required. This was to reflect the consultation with members over the past twelve months, recognise the wards in the North and East fall into two distinct communities, and to reflect the governance arrangements that had been in place and worked over the past few years. The deputies would not be remunerated.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.    The appointment of a District Lead for each District Area and a Deputy District Lead in the North District and East District be agreed.

2.    The allowance for the District Leads of £6,286, following a recommendation of the Independent Remuneration Panel and the adjustment to the basic allowance as outlined in the report, be agreed.

3.    The following Members be appointed as District Leads and Deputy District Leads:

Central District Lead – Councillor Salamat

North District Lead – Councillor S Bashforth

North District Deputy – Councillor Williamson

East District Lead – Councillor Cosgrove

East District Deputy – Councillor Byrne

South District Lead – Councillor Davis

West District Lead – Councillor Brownridge

 

 

16.

Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report 2020/21 pdf icon PDF 261 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor McLaren MOVED and Councillor Akhtar SECONDED a report of Cllr Colin McLaren, Chair of the Overview and Scrutiny Board, 2020/21

Cllr Riaz Ahmad, Chair of the Overview and Scrutiny Performance and Value for Money Select Committee, 2020/21 and Cllr Shoab Akhtar, Chair of the Health Scrutiny Committee, 2020/21, which provided the Council with the Overview and Scrutiny Annual report for the 2020/21 Municipal Year as require by the Council’s Constitution at Overview and Scrutiny Procedure Rule 4.1.

 

The report outlined the statutory role of overview and scrutiny; the roles and responsibilities of the Overview and Scrutiny Board, the Overview and Scrutiny Performance and Value for Money Select Committee and the Health Scrutiny Committee in 2020/21; and a summary of the considerations and work undertaken by the three bodies during 2020/21.

 

Councillor McLaren offered his thanks to all the officers and Members who had contributed to the Scrutiny programme during 2020 and 2021, ably supported by the Constitutional Services Team , who had helped to facilitate the programme.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.    The Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report for 2020/21 be noted.

2.    The thanks of the Chairs expressed to Cabinet Members, Council Officers and representatives from partner organisations for their support and contributions in the delivery of as full a scrutiny function as was achievable during the difficult times in 2020/21 be supported.

17.

Organisational Framework pdf icon PDF 150 KB

Minutes:

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Sheldon SECONDED the report of the Chief Executive.

 

Members were reminded that, in July 2021, Council approved the Council’s Covid-19 Recovery Strategy (Corporate Plan) for the Borough. The new strategy set out ambitions in six areas – driving equality; investing in quality housing; championing a green recovery; creating and protecting jobs and supporting businesses; prioritising education, skills and early years and promoting health and wellbeing including protecting the most vulnerable.

 

There was a requirement that appropriate Executive Leadership arrangements were put in place for the Council to deliver against the ambitions of the plan and also to continue to deliver statutory services and priorities.

 

Members were informed that the Council’s Appointments Committee had met and considered revisions to the Council’s Senior Management Team Structure and the report detailed a recommendation from that Committee for Full Council’s consideration.

 

RESOLVED that the recommendations as detailed in the report be agreed.