Agenda and minutes

Council
Wednesday, 12th December, 2018 6.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber, Civic Centre, Oldham, West Street, Oldham, OL1 1NL. View directions

Contact: Liz Drogan 

Items
No. Item

1.

Questions to Cabinet Members from the public and Councillors on ward or district issues

(15 minutes for public questions and 25 minutes for Councillor questions)

Minutes:

The Mayor advised the meeting that the first item on the agenda was Public Question Time.  The questions had been received from members of the public and would be taken in the order in which they had been received.  Council was advised that if the questioner was not present, then the question would be read out by the Mayor.

 

The following questions had been submitted:

 

1.         Question received from Judith Maughan via email:

 

            “Why is it that council services are on line and encourage to do on line, I cannot Pay for a application for a blue badge by cash or debit card only by cheque please email me back with a reply. Thanking you.”

 

            Councillor Chauhan, Cabinet Member for Health and Social Care responded that the issue had been recognised and that residents would be able to pay for a Blue Badge online or by telephone soon.  The Blue Badge service had moved to Access Oldham and the service would be available for five days instead of two days.  Access Oldham was closer to the bus station and parking.

 

2.         Question received from Syed Maruf Ali via Twitter:

 

           Oversubscription criteria is when a school receives more applications than there are places available (published admissions number, or PAN), the oversubscription criteria is used. Every school has an oversubscription criteria and it dictates the order in which places are allocated. Many existing faith schools have complex policies for allocating school places when oversubscribed, which critics say advantage more affluent parents over families from working-class backgrounds. A report from the social mobility charity Sutton Trust in March last year suggested faith schools were among the most ''Social selective'' of top state schools in the country. More than three times as selective as non-faith schools, and make up 33.4% of the list. Converter academies admit the lowest rate of disadvantaged pupils of the main school types, and comprise 63% of the top schools, compared to just 40% of all secondary's. We the residents of Coppice/Primrose Bank believe that many School in Oldham discriminate pupils from Town Centre Base using the oversubscription criterial especially the Faith School. I would like to know if the cabinet members have seen the oversubscription criteria for Cranmer Education Trust or have a copy of the over-subscription criteria? Has there been a discussion with Cranmer Education Trust about their over-subscription criteria and has this been shared with the Town centre base Cllrs? What criteria will Cranmer Trust use for example if they receive 300 pupils applying under faith base criteria and 300 pupils applying from 3 geographical zones?”

 

            Councillor P. Jacques, Cabinet Member for Education and Culture responded that the over-subscription criteria for the proposed new secondary school had not yet been set as the school had yet to be approved.  The over-subscription criteria would be addressed during the pre-opening phase should the school be approved.  The over-subscription criteria would be subject to further consultation.  School admissions proposals would be reviewed by the School Adjudicator as the Department  ...  view the full minutes text for item 1.

2.

To receive apologies for absence

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors G. Alexander, Haque, A. Hussain, Larkin, Rehman, Salamat and Turner.

3.

To order that the Minutes of the meeting of the Council held on 7th November 2018 be signed as a correct record pdf icon PDF 438 KB

Minutes:

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Council meeting held on 11th November 2018 be approved as a correct record.

4.

To receive declarations of interest in any matter to be determined at the meeting

Minutes:

In accordance with the Code of Conduct, elected members declared the following interests:

 

Councillor M. Bashforth declared a personal interest in Item 14a by virtue of her appointment to the MioCare Board.

Councillor Chauhan declared a personal interest in Item 14a by virtue of his appointment to the MioCare Board.

Councillor F. Hussain declared a personal interest in Item 14a by virtue of his appointment to the MioCare Board.

Councillor Heffernan declared a personal interest in Item 14a by virtue of his appointment to the MioCare Board.

Councillor Garry declared a pecuniary interest in Item 14b by virtue of her husband’s employment by Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor C. Gloster declared a pecuniary interest in Item 14b by virtue of his employment by Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor H. Gloster declared a pecuniary interest in Item 14b by virtue of her husband’s employment by Greater Manchester Police.

Councillor Roberts declared a personal interest in Item 19 by virtue of her appointment to the Positive Steps Board.

Councillor P. Jacques declared a personal interest in Item 19 by virtue of his appointment to the Positive Steps Board.

Councillor Ali declared a personal interest in Item 19 by virtue of his appointment to the Positive Steps Board.

Councillor Malik declared a personal interest in Item 19 by virtue of his appointment to the Positive Steps Board.

5.

To deal with matters which the Mayor considers to be urgent business

Minutes:

There were no items of urgent business.

6.

To receive communications relating to the business of the Council

Minutes:

There were no communications for Council.

7.

To receive and note petitions received relating to the business of the Council pdf icon PDF 81 KB

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There are four petitions to note.

Minutes:

The Mayor advised that four petitions had been received for noting by Council:

 

People and Place

 

Reference 2018-17: Petition entitled “Greenfield by Name; Greenfield by Nature”, Objections to Planning Application PA/342222/18 – Land to Rear of 29 – 51 Shaw Hall Bank Road and 5 – 23 Shaw Hall Close, Greenfield, Saddleworth, OL8 7LD (Saddleworth South Ward) received on 29 October 2018 with 665 signatures.

 

Reference 2018-19: Petition requesting Traffic Calming Procedures on Keb Lane (Medlock Vale Ward) received on 15 November 2018 with 99 signatures.

 

Reference 2018-21:  Petition for Street Lighting and Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour behind Garforth Street (Coldhurst Ward) received on 3 December 2018 with 51 signatures.

 

Corporate and Commercial

 

Reference 2018-20: Petition related to Welfare Rights, Benefits and Adult Social Care (Borough Wide), received on 26 November 2018 with 251 signatures.

 

RESOLVED that the petitions received since the last meeting of the Council be noted.

 

8.

Outstanding Business from the previous meeting

(time limit 15 minutes).

 

Air Quality

Councillor Shah to MOVE and Councillor Jabbar to SECOND:

This council notes that air quality remains a significant issue affecting the life quality of the residents of Oldham, with levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) driven up primarily by road transport. Local modelling has identified a number of stretches of road in the borough where NO2 levels are expected to exceed legal limits beyond 2020, mainly on major roads near our town centres.

Air pollution recognises no boundaries, so a response is needed from individuals, from local governments and from national government. This council notes the important work ongoing across Greater Manchester to campaign for clean air, and welcomes the commitment of the Combined Authority to hit World Health Organisation targets for air quality by 2030 as part of being a WHO BreatheLife City. Greater Manchester councils have also pledged to be 100% fossil fuel free by 2050.

Given the scale of the challenge, this council notes with concern that national government has recently removed grants to encourage the take up of electric vehicles, and acknowledges the criticism of this decision by the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee.  

This council resolves:

1)    To work closely with the GMCA to deliver the Clean Air Plan, and to continue to promote the GM Clean Air campaign to encourage residents to think about how they can do their bit to reduce air pollution.

2)    To ask the Chief Executive to seek immediate clarification from the Secretary of State on how national government will support Oldham’s ambitions to improve air quality, particularly given recent decisions to cut grants for electric vehicles.

3)    To seek new opportunities to further establish Oldham as the region’s greenest borough and improve the life chances of residents and particularly young people beyond the Clean Air Plan, including:

a)    Reducing air pollution caused by vehicle use around schools at the start and end of the school day.

b)    Incentivising the use of electric vehicles through improved access to charging points and other preferential schemes, preparing the borough for a future where 3 million charging points will be needed nationally by 2040.

c)    Growing trees in key sites in the borough to dampen pollution effects and make more liveable places.

 

 

 

 

Minutes:

Air Quality

Councillor Shah MOVED and Councillor Jabbar SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

“This Council notes that air quality remains a significant issue affecting the life quality of the residents of Oldham, with levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) driven up primarily by road transport.  Local modelling has identified a number of stretches of road in the borough where NO2 levels are expected to exceed legal limits beyond 2020, mainly on major roads near our town centres.

Air pollution recognises no boundaries, so a response is needed from individuals, from local governments and from national government.  This council notes the important work ongoing across Greater Manchester to campaign for clean air, and welcomes the commitment of the Combined Authority to hit World Health Organisation targets for air quality by 2030 as part of being a WHO Breathelife City.  Greater Manchester councils have also pledged to be 100% fossil fuel free by 2050.

Given the scale of the challenge, this council notes with concern that national government has recently removed grants to encourage the take up of electric vehicles, and acknowledges the criticism of this decision by the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee.

This council resolves:

1)    To work closely with the GMCA to deliver the Clean Air Plan, and to continue to promote the GM Clean Air campaign to encourage residents to think about how they can do their bit to reduce air pollution.

2)    To ask the Chief Executive to seek immediate clarification from the Secretary of State on how national government will support Oldham’s ambitions to improve air quality, particularly given recent decisions to cut grants for electric vehicles.

3)    To seek new opportunities to further establish Oldham as the region’s greenest borough and improve the life chances of residents and particularly young people beyond the Clean Air Plan, including:

a.     Reducing air pollution cause by vehicle use around schools at the start and end of the school day.

b.     Incentivising the use of electric vehicles through improved access to charging points and other preferential schemes, preparing the borough for a future where 3 million charging points will be needed nationally by 2040.

c.     Growing trees in key sites in the borough to dampen pollution effects and make more liveable places.”

 

AMENDMENT

 

Councillor C. Gloster MOVED and Councillor Sykes SECONDED the following AMENDMENT:

 

Amend resolution Point 3a) by adding at the end ‘and at play areas, care homes and medical facilities by:

·               Looking to Introduce pilot schemes such as enforceable ‘no-idling’ zones, street closure orders or ‘gates’ outside schools and children’s play areas in the Borough.

·               Working with our NHS partners, to look at extending ‘no-idling’ zones outside Medical Centres, care homes and in hospital ‘pick up’ areas.’

·               Discouraging, through our licensing powers, idling by taxis and private hire vehicles, using enforcement powers when necessary.

·               Requiring drivers of Council operated vehicles not to idle, and ask the same of our public sector partners and our public transport providers with respect to their own vehicles.

·               Conducting an information campaign  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8.

9.

Youth Council

(time limit 20 minutes)

 

There is no Youth Council business to consider.

Minutes:

There were no items submitted by the Youth Council.

10.

Leader and Cabinet Question Time

(time limit 30 minutes – maximum of 2 minutes per question and 2 minutes per response)

Minutes:

The Leader of the Main Opposition, Councillor Sykes, raised the following two questions:

 

Question 1:    Who decides on the GMSF Plan?

 

“My first question to the Leader tonight returns to a subject that I asked him about in September – who will be responsible for taking the decision in this Council whether to adopt the final proposals for the Greater Manchester Spatial Framework.  I make no apology for asking this question again as circumstances seem to have changed on this issue since we last spoke in this Chamber about it.  On 1 October 2018, the Mayor of Greater Manchester and the ten Council leaders who are the Greater Manchester Combined Authority issued a media release which stated categorically that:

‘Leaders also commit to ensuring that the formal draft plan is put before each Council to ensure real democratic debate and scrutiny.  The draft Greater Manchester Spatial Framework must be approved by each and every local council next summer.  The Mayor and Leaders have today made clear that regardless of the requirements, they are committed to ensuring that the formal draft Plan is put before each Council to ensure real democratic engagement, debate and scrutiny.  Local ward councillors will have their say on this plan.  Throughout this process we have always committed to taking the GMSF through local councils.’

On 30 November 2018, the Greater Manchester Combined Authority issued a further statement which stated categorically:

‘Before we go out for a second time (in the summer of 2019) the revised Greater Manchester Spatial Framework will be taken to all the local authorities and councils within the city-region for discussion, debate and ultimately sign-off.’

As I read these two statements, they would appear to imply that all Greater Manchester local authority leaders, including yourself, have agreed to bring the draft GMSF plan before a full meeting of their Council for scrutiny and debate and for ward members to vote on whether their local Council chooses to adopt the plan?  This appears to be contrary to the one you outlined in your response to my question on the matter at the September meeting of full Council.  Here you indicated that you as Leader would make the final decision.  Please can I ask the Leader to clarify the current position as he sees it?”

 

Councillor Fielding, Leader of the Council, advised the meeting he stood by his response to that question when it was previously asked at a previous Council meeting.  It was not intended to bring the Greater Manchester Spatial Framework (GMSF) prior to consultation to this meeting as the consultation needed to be undertaken.  It had been delayed too many times.  People were getting frustrated at the number of times GMSF had been delayed given that it was such a significant strategic plan that affected so many residents across the borough.  What was the case and had not changed was that the deposit version of the plan would be coming forward for consultation and voting on by members of the Chamber and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10.

11.

To note the Minutes of the meetings of the Cabinet held on the undermentioned dates, including the attached list of urgent key decisions taken since the last meeting of the Council, and to receive any questions or observations on any items within the Minutes from Members of the Council who are not Members of the Cabinet, and receive responses from Cabinet Members pdf icon PDF 166 KB

(time limit 20 minutes):-

 

a) 22nd October 2018

 

Minutes:

The minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 22nd October 2018 were submitted.

 

There were no questions or observations.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 22nd October 2018 be noted.

 

12.

Notice of Administration Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

Universal Credit

Councillor Jabbar to MOVE and Councillor Judd to SECOND

This council notes with great concern the recent reports from the United Nations on extreme poverty and human rights in the UK, and from the Equality and Human Rights Commission on the unequal (and possibly illegal) impact of government cuts. The UN highlighted a number of issues that we as Oldhamers know through experience, including that:

·         “Local authorities …which perform vital roles in providing a real social safety net have been gutted by a series of government policies.”

·         “As a result of changes to taxes, benefits, and public spending from 2010 through 2020, Black and Asian households in the lowest fifth of incomes will experience the largest average drop in living standards, about 20%.”

·         “Another 1.5 million more children will fall into poverty between 2010 and 2021/22 as a result of the changes to benefits and taxes, a 10% increase”.

·         “The experience of the United Kingdom, especially since 2010, underscores the conclusion that poverty is a political choice.”

Universal Credit, introduced by the Coalition Government, is at the heart of the misery inflicted upon so many in our communities. While the government stoically insists on a punitive five week wait time before receiving any benefits, the Peabody Trust estimates that more than 100,000 children are at risk in households struggling with this wait over Christmas. The government’s solution – advance loans for those able to prove they can’t afford to eat – only serves to extend the hardship with one in three claimants losing up to 40% of their monthly income to repay these debts.

Government welfare reform policy has increased the overall level of deprivation in Oldham and resulted in 40.66% of our children living in poverty.

The latest Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, and fifth in a little over two years, has acknowledged the “real problems” with Universal Credit and promised a root-and-branch review. To this end, this council resolves to instruct the Chief Executive to write to the Rt Hon Amber Rudd MP, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, inviting her to:

1.    Visit Oldham as part of her review, to learn from councillors, officers and residents about the effects of her government’s policies since the borough became a pathfinder for Universal Credit in 2013.

2.    Eliminate the five week delay in receiving benefits, as recommended by the UN, or at least reduce it to two weeks, as recommended by the Peabody Trust.

3.    Review the effectiveness of the ‘digital by default’ approach to managing and maintaining Universal Credit claims for vulnerable residents

4.    End on-going austerity measures such as the benefit freeze to working age benefits which are set to continue until 2020

 

 

 

Motion 2

Gender Based Violence

Councillor Ur-Rehman to MOVE and Councillor Stretton to SECOND:

This council notes that Monday 10th December was Human Rights Day, marking the end of an international 16 days of activism against gender-based violence. The campaign aims  ...  view the full agenda text for item 12.

Minutes:

Motion 1 – Universal Credit

 

Councillor Jabbar MOVED and Councillor Judd SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

“This council notes with great concern the recent reports from the United Nations on extreme poverty and human rights in the UK, and from the Equality and Human Rights Commission on the unequal (and possibly illegal) impact of government cuts.  The UN highlighted a number of issues that we as Oldhamers know through experience, including that:

·         ‘Local authorities … which perform vital roles in providing a real social safety net have been gutted by a series of government policies’

·         ‘As a result of changes to taxes, benefits and public spending from 2010 through 2020, Black and Asian households in the lowest fifth of incomes will experience the largest average drop in living standards, about 20%’

·         ‘Another 1.5 million more children will fall into poverty between 2010 and 2021/22 as a result of the changes to benefits and taxes, a 10% increase.’

·         ‘The experience of the United Kingdom, especially since 2010, underscores the conclusion that poverty is a political choice.’

Universal Credit, introduced by the Coalition Government, is at the heart of the misery inflicted upon so many of our communities.  While the government stoically insists on a punitive five week wait time before receiving any benefits, the Peabody Trust estimates that more than 100,000 children are a risk in households struggling with this wait over Christmas.  The government’s solution – advance loans for those able to prove they can’t afford to eat – only serves to extend the hardship with one in three claimants losing up to 40% of their monthly income to repay these debts.

Government welfare reform policy has increased the overall level of deprivation in Oldham and resulted in 40.66% of our children living in poverty.

The latest Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, and fifth in a little over two years, has acknowledged the ‘real problems’ with Universal Credit and promised a root-and-branch review.  To this end, this council resolves to instruct the Chief Executive to write to the Rt Hon Amber Rudd MP, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, inviting her to:

1.    Visit Oldham as part of her review, to learn from councillors, officers and residents about the effects of her government’s policies since the borough became a pathfinder for Universal Credit in 2013.

2.    Eliminate the five week delay in receiving benefits, as recommended by the UN, or at least reduce it to two weeks, as recommended by the Peabody Trust.

3.    Review the effectiveness of the ‘digital by default’ approach to managing and maintaining Universal Credit claims for vulnerable residents.

4.    End on-going austerity measures such as the benefit freeze to working age benefits which are set to continue until 2020

 

Councillor Harkness spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Sykes spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Ball spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor P. Jacques spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Ahmad spoke in support of the Motion.

 

Councillor Jabbar exercised  ...  view the full minutes text for item 12.

13.

Notice of Opposition Business

(time limit 30 minutes)

 

Motion 1

Improving Public Safety in Oldham’s Night time Economy

Councillor H Gloster to MOVE and Councillor Sykes to SECOND:

Council notes that:

·         In Bradford and Manchester local businesses and community groups have joined with local colleges and universities to establish Student Safe Spots / Zones; these are premises self-identifying as havens for students who are being followed, or are feeling vulnerable or unwell.

Staff at these venues offer assistance in booking taxis home; in contacting the emergency services if their assistance is required; or offer a temporary safe haven until a problem has passed. Venues signed up to the scheme receive a sticker to place prominently to advertise their involvement and a list and map of venues is published on line for students to access.

·           In Bradford, there also exists an agreement with local taxi businesses that students without money but presenting with a valid student ID badge will be offered carriage and the bill is then sent to the student for payment, via the relevant college and university authorities.

·      The ‘Ask for Angela’ scheme is operated nationwide in many pubs and clubs.

If a member of the public who feels vulnerable or threatened ‘Asks for Angela’ of the on-premises staff they know to take that person to a safer location and offer them assistance, such as calling a taxi, contacting friends or in certain circumstances ringing the police. Premises promoting the scheme display posters, which are usually placed in the toilets of those establishments to be discreet.

Council believes that establishing such schemes in our borough would help safeguard vulnerable people in our Borough, especially students and women enjoying our night time economy, and would complement the excellent work being done by the Oldham Street Angels.

Council therefore resolves to ask the Overview and Scrutiny Board to examine in conjunction with relevant partners, including the Oldham College, Oldham Sixth Form College, University Campus Oldham, schools with post-16 provision, licensed premises and public and private hire taxi businesses, the practicality of establishing such schemes as soon as possible in our town and district centres.

 

Motion 2

Changes to the Planning System to Fast-track Fracking:

Councillor Murphy top MOVE and Councillor Heffernan to SECOND:

Council notes:

·         With concern that the government is proposing two major changes to the planning system as it applies to shale gas extraction (or fracking) by:

-       Granting automatic planning permission for exploratory drilling prior to fracking, using ‘permitted development’ rules. This would remove the need for companies to submit a planning application and so also reduce local democratic scrutiny.

-       Including shale gas production projects in the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects regime. This would take decision-making powers on shale gas production away from local councils and hand it to central government.

·         That wherever fracking has been proposed, it has been opposed by the public and local authorities because of real fears about noise, traffic, air pollution, the impact on the countryside, and the effects on climate change.

·         That the  ...  view the full agenda text for item 13.

Minutes:

Motion 1 – Improving Public Safety in Oldham’s Night time Economy

 

Councillor H. Gloster MOVED and Councillor Sykes SECONDED the following MOTION:

 

“Council notes that:

·         In Bradford and Manchester local businesses and community groups have joined with local colleges and universities to establish Student Safe Spots/Zones; these are premises self-identifying as havens for students who are being followed,or are feeling vulnerable and unwell.

Staff at these venues offer assistance in booking taxis home; in contacting the emergency services if their assistance is required; or offer a temporary safe haven until a problem has passed.  Venues signed up to the scheme receive a sticker to place prominently to advertise their involvement  and a list and map of venues is published on line for students to access.

·         In Bradford, there also exists an agreement with local taxi businesses that students without money but presenting with a valid student ID badge will be offered carriage and the bill is then sent to the student for payment, via the relevant college and university authorities.

·         The ‘Ask for Angela’ scheme is operated nationwide in many pubs and clubs.  If a member of the public who feels vulnerable and threatened ‘Asks for Angela’ of the on-premises staff, they know to take that person to a safer location and offer them assistance, such as calling a taxi, contacting friends or in certain circumstances ringing the police.  Premises promoting the scheme display posters, which are usually placed in the toilets of those establishments to be discreet.

Council believes that establishing such schemes in our borough would help safeguard vulnerable people in our Borough, especially students and women enjoying our night time economy, and would complement the excellent work being done by the Oldham Street Angels.

Council therefore resolves to ask the Overview and Scrutiny Board to examine in conjunction with relevant partners, including the Oldham College, Oldham Sixth Form College, University Campus Oldham, schools with post-16 provision, licensed premises and public and private hire taxi businesses, the practicality of establishing such schemes as soon as possible in our town and district centres.”

 

Councillor Iqbal spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Shah spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Chauhan spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Shuttleworth spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor McLaren spoke in support of the Motion.

Councillor Williamson spoke in support of the Motion.

 

Members recorded their thanks for the work of the Street Angels.

 

Councillor H. Gloster did not exercise her right of reply.

 

On being put to the vote, the MOTION was CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY.

 

RESOLVED that the Overview and Scrutiny Board be asked to examine in conjunction with relevant partners, including the Oldham College, Oldham Sixth Form College, University Campus Oldham, schools with post-16 provision, licensed premises and public and private hire taxi businesses, the practicality of establishing such schemes as soon as possible in our town and district centres.

 

Motion 2 – Changes to the Planning System to Fast-track Fracking:

 

Councillor Murphy MOVED and Councillor Heffernan SECONDED the following  ...  view the full minutes text for item 13.

14a

To note the Minutes of the following Partnership meetings and the relevant spokespersons to respond to questions from Members pdf icon PDF 308 KB

(time limit 7 minutes)

 

MioCare Board

17 September 2018

Health and Wellbeing Board

  25 September 2018

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the following Partnership meetings were submitted as follows:

 

MioCare Board                                             17th September 2018

Health and Wellbeing Board                      25th September 2018

 

There were no questions or observations on the Partnership minutes.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Partnership minutes as detailed in the report be noted.

 

14b

To note the Minutes of the following Joint Authority meetings and the relevant spokespersons to respond to questions from Members pdf icon PDF 377 KB

(time limit 8 minutes):-

 

Greater Manchester Combined Authority Waste and Recycling Committee

 

  13 September 2018

Police and Crime Panel

30 October 2018

Greater Manchester Combined Authority

 

  26 October 2018

National Park Authority

5 October 2018

Transport for Greater Manchester

14 September 2018

Greater Manchester Health and Care Board

14 September 2018

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the following Joint Authorities meetings were submitted as follows:

 

Greater Manchester Combined Authority Waste

And Recycling Committee                                                  13th September 2018

Police and Crime Panel                                                      30th October 2018

Greater Manchester Combined Authority                        26th October 2018

National Park Authority                                                       5th October 2018

Transport for Greater Manchester                                    14th September 2018

Greater Manchester Health and Care Board                  14th September 2018

 

There were no questions on the Joint Authorities minutes.

 

Members raised the following observations:

 

Councillor H. Gloster – GMCA Waste and Recycling Committee, 13th September 2018, Item WRC 18/24 – Plastic Free GM.  Councillor H. Gloster raised the GMCA requirements and that the local authorities knew their communities better in order to reduce plastics and found it difficult that ‘one size fits all’ would be successful.

 

Councillor Hewitt, Greater Manchester Waste and Recycling Committee Representative, responded that GMWDA worked with local authorities and did not dictate but overseen.  The local authority was charged with recycling.

 

Councillor Sheldon, GMCA, 26th October 2018, Item 219/18 – Northern and Transpennine Express Rail Performance Update.  Councillor Sheldon raised that the Leader of Tameside Council had raised the poor service.  Councillor Sheldon expressed disappointment that the Leader had not mentioned that poor service at Greenfield with ongoing poor service and disruption caused daily.  Councillor Sheldon asked that Greenfield not be forgotten as public transport should be promoted.

 

Councillor Fielding, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Economy and Enterprise assured that Greenfield Rail Station was not forgotten and the issue raised a number of times including the Leader’s first GMCA meeting In June.  The issue of Greenfield Station was lobbied regularly and the Leader would ensure that it was raised at the next meeting.

 

Councillor Sykes, Police and Crime Panel, 30th October 2018.  Councillor Sykes raised the issues that were discussed on the agenda and raised that no issues such as those raised at Council were on the agenda and asked if this was just a ‘blip’ and raised the shortage of uniformed officers and other work to be done.

 

Councillor Williams, Police and Crime Panel representative raised the precept for police expenditure.  The Steering Group addressed most of the ‘nitty gritty’ work.  The Panel’s responsibility was to ensure that the Deputy Mayor did what she was supposed to do.

 

Councillor Sykes, GMCA, 26th October 2018, Item 222/18 – Devolution of the Adult Education Budget.  Councillor Sykes raised the issue of the allocation of the funding provision.  Adult Education was to provide better life chances.  The total spend could have been used in Oldham alone for essential skills needed to allow an unqualified workforce access to better jobs.

 

Councillor Fielding, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Economy and Enterprise highlighted the principle of devolution and agreed with the observation related to funding.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.         The minutes of the Partnership minutes as detailed in the report be noted.

2.         The observations and responses provided be noted.

 

15.

Update on Actions from Council pdf icon PDF 83 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Director of Legal Services which informed members of actions that had been taken following previous Council meetings and provided feedback on other issues raised at the meeting.

 

RESOLVED that the update on Actions from Council be noted.

 

16.

Failsworth East By-Election Result and Political Balance Update pdf icon PDF 215 KB

Report to follow.

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Director of Legal Services which detailed the results of the recent Failsworth East By-Election and notification that one Borough Councillor was no longer a member of the Labour Group.  A review had been undertaken and changes made to committee members related to political groups.

 

RESOLVED that:

 

1.         The result of the Failsworth East By-election held on 29th November 2018 be noted.

2.         The new composition of the political groups as outlined in the report be noted.

3.         The following Committee changes be agreed:

·         The two vacancies on Licensing be filled by Councillor Harrison and Councillor Haque

·         The vacancy on the Charitable Trust be filled by Councillor E. Jacques

·         Councillor Malik step down as a member of the O&S Performance and Value for Money Select Committee

·         Councillor Azad step down as an Independent Member on Audit

·         Councillor Azad be appointed as an Independent Member of O&S Performance and Value for Money Select Committee

·         Councillor Rehman be appointed as an Independent Member on the Audit Committee.

4.         The following substitutes be agreed:

·         Councillor Davis on Audit Committee

·         Councillor E. Jacques on Overview and Scrutiny Board.

 

17.

Brexit Update pdf icon PDF 171 KB

Report to follow.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council gave consideration to an update on the potential implications of the ‘leave’ result for Oldham and Greater Manchester.  The report provided an update on the latest GMCA Brexit Monitor report dated 30th November 2018.  The report referenced the latest analysis, key aspects of the Withdrawal Agreement which included the financial settlement, citizen rights, transition period and the Northern Ireland protocol.  The Brexit Monitor also examined the impact of Brexit on the economic function.  It was reported that the Gross Domestic Product had grown to 0.6% between Q2 and Q3 (which was below the pre-Brexit predicted 2.1%).

 

Councillor Fielding spoke on the report.

Councillor Judd spoke on the report.

 

RESOLVED that the update on the European Union Referendum be noted.

18.

Civic Appreciation Nomination pdf icon PDF 85 KB

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Chief Executive which sought approval for the nomination of Alan Noble and Trevor Warren to receive the Council’s Civic Appreciation Award. 

 

The nomination was in recognition of Mr. Noble’s and Mr. Warren’s significant voluntary contribution and dedication to the borough and community of Oldham.

 

RESOLVED that:

 

1.         The nomination for Mr. Noble and Mr. Warren to receive the Civic Appreciation Award 2018 be agreed.

2.         The ceremony for the award to take place at the Council meeting to be held on 20th March 2019.

 

19.

Youth Justice Plan pdf icon PDF 116 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council gave consideration to the Youth Justice Strategic Plan which set out the strategy for the Youth Justice Service (YJS) for 2018/19.  It was a statutory duty that the Local Authority produce an annual plan.  The strategy also set out an outline action plan which set out how the Youth Justice Service would achieve its primary functions and key objectives.  The service was overseen by the Youth Justice Management Board which included representatives from the Local Authority and other statutory partners.  The Board held the service to account for the achievement of performance targets, provided challenge where required and endorsed the strategic direction and operational delivery of the service.

 

Councillor Chadderton spoke on the report.

 

RESOLVED that the Youth Justice Service Plan 2018/19 be approved.

 

20.

Gambling Policy Review pdf icon PDF 264 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council gave consideration to the revised Gambling Policy. 

 

The Gambling Act 2005 created a new system of licensing and regulation for commercial gambling.  The Act gave local authorities new and extended responsibilities for licensing premises for gambling and associated permissions.  The Council must show how it sought to promote the licensing objectives under the Act.  The role of the licensing authority was outlined in the report.

 

The current policy was adopted in January 2016 and had to be reviewed every 3 years.  Most gambling policies issued by Councils would use the same template issued by the Local Government Association based on best practice and to ensure a consistent approach nationally 

 

RESOLVED that the Gambling Policy be approved.

 

21.

A- Boards Policy Statement Update pdf icon PDF 163 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report which identified issues caused by the inappropriate placing of ‘A’ boards on the highway and pavements and a policy response as part of the Council’s ‘Who Put That There’ street charter.

 

RESOLVED that the advertising ‘A’ Board and Signage policy be approved.

22.

Treasury Management Strategy pdf icon PDF 786 KB

Minutes:

Council gave consideration to a report of the Director of Finance which advised of the performance of the Treasury Management function of the Council for the first half of 2018/19 and provided a comparison of performance against the 2018/19 Treasury Management Strategy and Prudential Indicators.

 

The Council was required to consider the performance of the Treasury Management function in order to comply with the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy’s (CIPFA) Code of Practice on Treasury Management (revised 2017).  The report set out key Treasury Management issues for members’ information and review and outlined:

·         An economic update for the first six months of 2018/19;

·         A review of the Treasury Management Strategy Statement and Annual Investment Strategy;

·         The Council’s capital expenditure, as set out in the Capital Strategy (and prudential indicators);

·         A review of the Council’s investment portfolio for 2018/19;

·         A review of the Council’s borrowing strategy for 2018/19;

·         Why there had been no debt rescheduling undertaken during 2018/19; and

·         A review of compliance with Treasury and Prudential Limits for 2018/19.

 

The Treasury Management Half-Year Review 2018/19 report had been presented to and approved by Cabinet on 19 November 2018 and commended the report to Council.  The Audit Committee will give consideration to the report in January 2019.

 

RESOLVED that:

 

1.            The Treasury Management activity for the first half of the financial year 2018/19 and the projected outturn position be approved.

2.            The amendments to both Authorised Limit and Operational Boundary for external debt as set out in the table at Section 2.4.5 of the report be approved.

3.            The amendment to the Capital Financing Requirement (CFR) as set out in the table at Section 2.4.5 of the report be approved.

4.            The addition to the Treasury Management Strategy 2018/19 with regard to specified investment as presented at Appendix 3 to the report be approved.

 

23.

Organisational Framework pdf icon PDF 171 KB

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Chief Executive and Head of Paid Service which provided an update to the Pay Policy Statement.

 

There had been significant changes and developments across a wide range of services and models of delivery since the Greater Manchester Devolution Agreement had been signed in November 2013.  In particular, Greater Manchester Health and Social Care devolution had driven changes to arrangements for health and social care structures and modes of delivery.  In order to ensure that the organisation delivered against each key plan and continued to respond to its statutory services and its priorities, there was a requirement to ensure the Council continued to have appropriate Executive Leadership arrangements in place. 

 

The Pay Policy Statement 2018/19 had included the re-designation of senior posts, establishment of the role of Strategic Director of Reform and interim arrangements put in place for the statutory role of Director of Children’s Services.  Approval was sought to appointment to a permanent position of Managing Director, Children’s Services with a level of remuneration in excess of £100,000 but not higher than £120,000 per annum which was in line with benchmark data.  Approval was also sought for the role of Strategic Director of Reform to move from an interim arrangement to a permanent basis.  The remuneration for the post was £122,000 per annum.

 

Councillor Chadderton spoke on the report.

 

RESOLVED that:

 

1.         The Executive Leadership arrangements in place be noted.

2.         The post of Managing Director, Children’s Services being moved from an interim arrangement to a permanent appointment and to hold the statutory responsibility for Children’s Services be agreed.

3.         The post of Strategic Director of Reform being moved from an interim arrangement to a permanent appointment be agreed.